Locations

For Current Students

Hoboken

The Hudson School
601 Park Avenue
Hoboken, NJ 07030

Directions

Jersey City (Sept-June)

Boys and Girls Club

225 Morris Boulevard
Jersey City, NJ 07302

Directions

Jersey City (Summer Session)

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© 2018 by Alpha Minds Academy

Our efforts to include Science and Engineering subjects in our after-school program are based upon evidence that young people need to experience these subjects beyond the school day. Recent research indicates that interest in science before 8th grade is a better predictor of future academic and career decisions than math achievement test scores. Exploring topics such as  Astronomy, Air and Weather, Energy, Organisms, Solids and Liqiuds, Light and Sound, to name a few, will not only support students when it comes time to learn physics, chemistry

Engineering
Solids and Liquids

If you’ve ever followed a recipe, you know that the amount of each ingredient and the order in which you mix them matters.  Chemical engineers use these same principles when designing processes. When students read the storybook Michelle’s MVP Award, they learn about a girl who designs a better way to make play dough. The activities in this unit reinforce the science concepts “solid” and “liquid” as students explore the properties of different materials—and the properties of mixtures of materials. The final engineering design challenge? Design a process for making high-quality play dough.

Air and Weather

Mechanical engineering involves the design of anything with moving parts. In this unit, students will think like mechanical engineers—and also use their understanding of air as wind—to design and create wind-powered machines. The storybook Leif Catches the Wind introduces students to wind turbines that generate renewable energy. Students will study how common machines such as mechanical pencils and egg beaters work, then use their mechanical engineering skills to design sailboats and windmills that catch the wind.

Balance & Forces

When civil engineers design bridges, they must take into account factors like balance and motion. This unit introduces the principles behind bridge design with the storybook Javier Builds a Bridge, about a boy who needs a safe footbridge to get to his island play fort. Students will reinforce their understanding of “push” and “pull” as they explore how forces act on different structures. They’ll use what they know about balance and force as they experiment with beam, arch, and suspension bridges—and learn how bridge designs counteract and redirect forces and motion. In the final design challenge, students plan, build, and test their own bridges.

 Water

The water you drink is clean and safe thanks to the environmental engineers who design and manage our water supply and water treatment systems. In this unit, the storybook Saving Salila’s Turtle introduces students to the problem of water pollution—and to some solutions. Students will investigate the properties of filter materials, apply their knowledge of water, and think like environmental engineers as they plan, construct, test and improve their own water filters.

Organisms

Membranes are thin layers that let helpful substances pass through and keep harmful substances out. In this unit, students learn to think like bioengineers as they design a model membrane to mimic the properties of real membranes in live organisms. The storybook Juan Daniel’s Futbol Frog sets the scene, as students read about a boy who engineers a membrane to keep a frog alive. Students learn how membranes function and apply their knowledge of the basic needs of living organisms to the engineering design challenge: designing a frog habitat with a model membrane that delivers just the right amount of water.

Floating and Sinking

To study the ocean, scientists and engineers use submersibles—small, remote-controlled underwater vessels. This unit introduces students to the field of ocean engineering through the storybook Despina Makes a Splash, about girl in Greece who designs a submersible to retrieve lost diving goggles. Students learn about sounding poles and sonar as they map a section of ocean floor. Then they apply their knowledge of density, floating, and sinking to design their own submersible, equip it with research instruments, and retrieve packages from a model ocean floor.

 

 

"Engineering is Elementary" - Sample Topics (Gr. 1-5):

and biology, but it will also spark their lifelong exploration of science, technology, engineering and math.

 

Each unit starts with an engaging storybook about a child who solves a real-world problem through science and engineering. Our storybooks integrate literacy and social studies with the engineering and science lessons—and help students understand how STEM subjects are relevant to their lives, the lives of others and to our society as a whole. Each lesson consists of research-based, teacher-tested activities that develop creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Our hands-on, cooperative, project-based engineering activities that integrate with science instruction not only engage children and teach them how to investigate the way scientists work, but also aligns with the National Science Education Standards.  Each lesson teaches children how to think and behave like scientists.  Children learn how to form hypotheses, test their ideas, document their experiments, observe the results and make conclusions. 

 

SPRING 2016 SEMESTER:

Go Green: Engineering Recycled Racers

This semester, we will put on our engineering hats and go green to engineer recycled racers. Throughout this unit, children will learn about green engineering, the Recycled Racer Rally and work to engineer toy race cars made out of recycled materials.  They will build some example wheel systems and test how possible wheel materials roll.  Students will also have the chance to experiment with ways to use air power to move their racers. The unit is set in a real-world context: children will learn about the recycling culture in Senegal and the toys children make there.  

 
WINTER 2016 SEMESTER:
Sound and Light
We will begin this semester with the study of Sound. We start with a story of a young drummer from Ghana, Kwame, who is blind; his father, an acoustical engineer, shows Kwame that sound is vibration and can be represented with both visual symbols (such as musical notation and spectrograms) and tactile symbols. Hands-on activities in this unit will lead students to explore the properties of volume and pitch, investigate ways to dampen sound, and develop their own novel way to represent the key elements of sound. 
In the second part of our 11-week long session, students will explore another core physics topic: Light.  Optical engineers design all kinds of devices that use light to do something useful—from lasers and telescopes to fiber-optic communication systems. Students will be introduced to a story about an Egyptian boy who uses what he learns from optical engineers working inside ancient tombs to develop an ingenious system for lighting the dancers in a school performance. This unit gets students thinking like optical engineers as they explore how light interacts with different materials. They will use what they’ve learned about the properties of light as they design a system to illuminate hieroglyphics in a model tomb.
 
FALL 2015 SEMESTER:

We begin our new school year with the exciting new topic called Aerospace Engineering: Designing Parachutes. Throughout this unit, students will use what they learn about the science of astronomy to design and improve a parachute. The unit will begin with a story about a boy from Brazil who solves a similar engineering design challenge.  This unit introduces students to aerospace engineering—and how aerospace engineers use their knowledge of astronomy to design space technologies.  After completing this unit, students will be able to do the following:

  • explain how aerospace engineers design things that fly through air or space.

  • discuss atmospheres and drag (or air resistance) and how they relate.

  • identify the basic parts of a parachute and explain how parachutes work.

  • identify and explain the steps of the Engineering Design Process. 

WINTER 2020 CLASSES:
Weekday Classes (Hoboken)
January 6th - April 3rd
Saturday Classes (Jersey City)
January 4th - April 4th
Fall 2019 OPEN Chess Tournament 
November 24th, 10am-1 pm
Fall 2019 RATED Chess Tournament 
December 8th, 10am-1 pm

News and Upcoming Events

Congratulations to the participants and winners of our Spring 2019 Open Chess Tournament which took place on May 19th.

Photos from the event

Visit our Gallery for photos from our classes and events!